Gould’s Squid


Latin name: Nototodarus gouldi


Common names: Squid, Calamari, Arrow Squid

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Wild Caught

Region:
New Zealand

Key Facts

  • Two species of squid, known as arrow squid, caught in NZ are marketed in Australia as Gould's squid.
  • Arrow squid are fast growing, short-lived and quick to reproduce species, although reproduction varies according to environmental conditions.
  • Although no stock assessments have been conducted for these species, long-term catch records have been stable for 30 years, indicating the species is not at risk from fishing activity.
  • Arrow squid are mainly caught in trawls in NZ fisheries. These trawl fisheries have been identified as significant sources of mortality and population decline for the endemic and endangered New Zealand sea lion.

More information

  • New Zealand (1,377t frozen squid and octopus imported 2011-12)

Two species of squid, known as arrow squid, caught in New Zealand are marketed in Australia as Gould’s squid.

Arrow squid are fast growing, short-lived (around 12 months) species that reproduce quickly and produce a high number of offspring. Undertaking formal stock assessments (scientific assessments of the numbers of a species) of squid species is generally difficult for fishery managers, as reproduction is highly variable depending on environmental conditions. However, as catches of arrow squid have been stable for over 30 years, managers have assessed that the species is not at risk from fishing activity.

Arrow squid are mainly caught in trawl fisheries in NZ. The areas in which the fisheries operate overlaps with the habitat and feeding grounds of the endemic NZ sea lion, which is classed as ‘Nationally Critical’ under the NZ Threat Classification System. Historical hunting for pelts reduced populations to critical levels, and population recovery has been slow. The arrow squid fisheries have been identified as direct causes of NZ sea lion mortalities through capture in trawl nets. Ongoing population declines have again been documented in recent years, as a result of trawling fishing activity.